Browse by Subject: American

Please note that while you may order forthcoming books at any time, they will not be available for shipment until shortly before publication date

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The Emergence of Capitalism in Early America

Contesting the assumption that early American economists were committed to Adam Smith’s ideas of free trade and small government, this book provides a comprehensive history of the nation’s economic thought from 1790 to 1860, tracing the development of a uniquely American understanding of capitalism.

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NASA and the Long Civil Rights Movement

Examining the ways in which NASA’s goal of space exploration both conflicted and aligned with the cause of racial equality, this volume provides new insights into the complex relationship between the space program and the civil rights movement in the Jim Crow South and abroad.

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Deadly Virtue: Fort Caroline and the Early Protestant Roots of American Whiteness

In Deadly Virtue, Heather Martel argues that the French Protestant attempt to colonize Florida in the 1560s significantly shaped the developing concept of race in sixteenth-century America. Telling the story of the short-lived French settlement of Fort Caroline in what is now Jacksonville, Florida, Martel reveals how race, gender, sexuality, and Christian morality intersected to form the foundations of modern understandings of whiteness.

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Historical Archaeology of the Revolutionary War Encampments of Washington’s Army

This volume presents recent archaeological and ethnohistorical research on the encampments, trails, and support structures of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, illuminating the daily lives of soldiers, officers, and camp followers apart from the more well-known scenarios of military campaigns and battles.  

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The Letters of George Long Brown: A Yankee Merchant on Florida's Antebellum Frontier

The Letters of George Long Brown provides an important eyewitness view of north Florida’s transformation from a subsistence and herding community to a market economy based on cotton, timber, and other crops, showing that these changes came about in part due to an increased reliance on slavery. Brown’s letters offer the first social and economic history of one of the most important yet little-known frontiers in the antebellum South.  

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United States Reconstruction across the Americas

Historians have examined the American Civil War and its aftermath for more than a century, yet little work has situated this important era in a global context. Contributors to this volume open up ways of viewing Reconstruction not as an insular process but as an international phenomenon.  

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James Monroe: A Republican Champion

Despite serving his country for 50 years and being among the most qualified men to hold the office of president, James Monroe is an oft-forgotten Founding Father. In this book, Brook Poston reveals how Monroe attempted to craft a legacy for himself as a champion of American republicanism.    

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An Archaeology of Structural Violence: Life in a Twentieth-Century Coal Town

Drawing on material evidence from daily life in a coal-mining town, this book offers an up-close view of the political economy of the United States over the course of the twentieth century. This community’s story illustrates the great ironies of this era, showing how modernist progress and plenty were inseparable from the destructive cycles of capitalism.

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Franciscans and American Indians in Pan- Borderlands Perspective: Adaptation, Negotiation, and Resistance

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The Shadow of Selma

The Shadow of Selma provides a comprehensive assessment of the 1965 civil rights campaign, the historical memory of the marches, and the continuing relevance of and challenges to the Voting Rights Act. The essays consider Selma not just as a keystone event but, much like Ferguson today, as a transformative place: a supposedly unimportant location that became the focal point of epochal historical events.