Buy Books: Browse by Season: Fall 2018

Fall 2018 - Spring 2018 - Fall 2017 - Spring 2017 - Fall 2016 - Spring 2016

Please note that while you may order forthcoming books at any time, they will not be available for shipment until shortly before publication date

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Colonialism, Community, and Heritage in Native New England

Exploring museums and cultural centers in New England that hold important meanings for Native American communities today, this illuminating book offers a much-needed critique of the collaborative work being done to preserve and promote the cultural heritage of the region.

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Pedagogy and Practice in Heritage Studies

Pedagogy and Practice in Heritage Studies presents teaching strategies for helping students think critically about the meanings of the past today. In these case studies, experienced teachers discuss ways to integrate heritage studies values into archaeology curricula, illustrating how the fields enrich each other.

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History and Approaches to Heritage Studies

History and Approaches to Heritage Studies explores the historical development of cultural heritage theory and practice, as well as current issues in the field. This volume brings together archaeologists who are deeply engaged with a range of stakeholders in heritage management and training. 

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El Techo de la Ballena: Retro-Modernity in Venezuela

The work of the 1960s Caracas-based art collective El Techo de la Ballena (The Roof of the Whale) was called “subversive” and “art terrorism” and seen as a threat to Venezuela’s national image as an emerging industrial power. This volume details the historical and social contexts that shaped the collective, exploring how its anti-art aesthetic highlighted the shortcomings of the country’s newfound oil wealth and transition to democracy.

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Modernism and Food Studies: Politics, Aesthetics, and the Avant-Garde

The diverse topics and methodologies assembled here illustrate how food studies can enrich research in the literary and visual arts. A milestone volume, this collection introduces possibilities for understanding the connection between modernist aesthetics and the emerging food cultures of a globalizing world.  

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Amphibians and Reptiles of Florida

Florida is home to a more diverse variety of amphibians and reptiles than any other state due to its wide array of ecosystems—from pine forests to the subtropical Everglades to the tropical Keys—and its large number of established nonnative species. This volume is a comprehensive account of the 219 species known to exist in the state.

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James Monroe: A Republican Champion

Despite serving his country for 50 years and being among the most qualified men to hold the office of president, James Monroe is an oft-forgotten Founding Father. In this book, Brook Poston reveals how Monroe attempted to craft a legacy for himself as a champion of American republicanism.    

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The Cumberland River Archaic of Middle Tennessee

For thousands of years, the inhabitants of the Middle Cumberland River Valley harvested shellfish for food and raw materials then deposited the remains in dense concentrations along the river. Very little research has been published on the Archaic period shell mounds in this region. Demonstrating that nearly forty such sites exist, this volume presents the results of recent surveys, excavations, and laboratory work as well as fresh examinations of past investigations that have been difficult for scholars to access. 

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Modernist Communities across Cultures and Media

Marked by a rejection of traditional affiliations such as nation, family, and religion, modernism is often thought to privilege the individual over the community. The contributors to this volume question this assumption, uncovering the communal impulses of the modernist period across genres, cultures, and media.

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An Archaeology of Abundance: Reevaluating the Marginality of California’s Islands

The Alta and Baja California islands changed dramatically in the centuries after Spanish colonists arrived. Native populations were decimated, and their lives were altered through forced assimilation and the cessation of burning and traditional foraging practices. Overgrazing, overfishing, and the introduction of nonnative species depleted natural resources severely. Modern scientists have assumed the islands were similarly sparse before European contact, but An Archaeology of Abundance reassesses this long-held belief, analyzing new lines of evidence showing that the California Islands were rich in resources important to human populations.