Reframing Media, Technology, and Culture in Latin/o America

Edited by Héctor Fernández L’Hoeste, Georgia State University and Juan Carlos Rodríguez, Georgia Institute of Technology

Series Description:

Reframing Media, Technology, and Culture in Latin/o America explores how Latin American and Latino audiovisual (film, television, digital), musical (radio, recordings, live performances, dancing), and graphic (comics, photography, advertising) cultural practices reframe and reconfigure social, economic, and political discourses at a local, national, and global level. In addition, it looks at how information networks reshape public and private policies, and the enactment of new identities in civil society. The series also covers how different technologies have allowed and continue to allow for the construction of new ethnic spaces. It not only contemplates the interaction between new and old technologies but also how the development of brand-new technologies redefines cultural production.

For more Information:

Héctor Fernández L’Hoeste
Professor, Department of Modern & Classical Languages
Georgia State University
Atlanta, GA 30302-3970
fernandez@gsu.edu

Juan Carlos Rodríguez
Georgia Institute of Technology
juan.rodriguez@modlangs.gatech.edu




There are 2 books in this series.


Please note that while you may order forthcoming books at any time, they will not be available for shipment until shortly before publication date

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Mestizo Modernity: Race, Technology, and the Body in Postrevolutionary Mexico

After the end of the Mexican Revolution in 1917, post-revolutionary leaders hoped to assimilate the country’s racially diverse population into one official mixed-race identity—the mestizo. This book shows that as part of this vision, the Mexican government believed it could modernize “primitive” indigenous peoples through technology in the form of education, modern medicine, industrial agriculture, and factory work. David Dalton takes a close look at how authors, artists, and thinkers—some state-funded, some independent—engaged with official views of Mexican racial identity from the 1920s to the 1970s.

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Telling Migrant Stories: Latin American Diaspora in Documentary Film

Telling Migrant Stories explores how contemporary documentary film gives voice to Latin American immigrants whose stories would not otherwise be heard.