Buy Books: Browse by Season: Spring 2019

Spring 2019 - Fall 2018 - Spring 2018 - Fall 2017 - Spring 2017 - Fall 2016

Please note that while you may order forthcoming books at any time, they will not be available for shipment until shortly before publication date

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The Letters of George Long Brown: A Yankee Merchant on Florida's Antebellum Frontier

The Letters of George Long Brown provides an important eyewitness view of north Florida’s transformation from a subsistence and herding community to a market economy based on cotton, timber, and other crops, showing that these changes came about in part due to an increased reliance on slavery. Brown’s letters offer the first social and economic history of one of the most important yet little-known frontiers in the antebellum South.  

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Historical Archaeology of the Revolutionary War Encampments of Washington’s Army

This volume presents recent archaeological and ethnohistorical research on the encampments, trails, and support structures of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, illuminating the daily lives of soldiers, officers, and camp followers apart from the more well-known scenarios of military campaigns and battles.  

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United States Reconstruction across the Americas

Historians have examined the American Civil War and its aftermath for more than a century, yet little work has situated this important era in a global context. Contributors to this volume open up ways of viewing Reconstruction not as an insular process but as an international phenomenon.  

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The Archaeology of Prostitution and Clandestine Pursuits

The Archaeology of Prostitution and Clandestine Pursuits synthesizes case studies from various nineteenth-century sites where material culture reveals evidence of prostitution, including a brothel in Five Points, New York City’s most notorious neighborhood, and parlor houses a few blocks  from the White House and Capitol Hill.

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The Archaeology of Removal in North America

Exploring a wide range of settings and circumstances in which individuals or groups of people have been forced to move from one geographical location to another, the case studies in this volume demonstrate what archaeology can reveal about the agents, causes, processes, and effects of human removal.  

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Captain Kidd's Lost Ship: The Wreck of the Quedagh Merchant

The troubled chain of events involving Captain Kidd’s capture of Quedagh Merchant and his eventual execution for piracy in 1701 are well known, but the exact location of the much sought-after ship remained a mystery for more than 300 years. In 2010, a team of underwater archaeologists confirmed that the sunken remains of Quedgah Merchant had finally been found off the coast of the Dominican Republic.

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The Market for Mesoamerica: Reflections on the Sale of Pre-Columbian Antiquities

This timely volume explores past, current, and future policies and trends concerning the sales of antiquities from pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, which are among the most popular items on the international antiquities market         

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Shaping Identity in Medieval French Literature: The Other Within

Contributors to this collection consider the multiplicity and instability of medieval French literary identity, arguing that it is fluid and represented in many different ways. Inherently unstable, identity is created, re-created, adopted, refused, imposed, and self-imposed. Additionally, taken together the essays posit that an individual may identify with a group, existing within it, and yet remain foreign to it.  

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Fort St. Joseph Revealed: The Historical Archaeology of a Fur Trading Post

Fort St. Joseph Revealed is the first synthesis of archaeological and documentary data on one of the most important French colonial outposts in the western Great Lakes region. Located in what is now Michigan, Fort St. Joseph was home to a flourishing fur trade society from the 1680s to 1781. The site—lost for centuries—was discovered in 1998 by volume editor Michael Nassaney and his colleagues, who summarize their extensive excavations at the fort and surrounding areas in these essays.  

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Cahokia in Context: Hegemony and Diaspora

At its height between AD 1050 and 1275, the city of Cahokia was the largest settlement of the Mississippian culture, acting as an important trade center and pilgrimage site. While the influence of Cahokian culture on the development of monumental architecture, maize-based subsistence practices, and economic complexity throughout North America is undisputed, new research in this volume reveals a landscape of influence of the regions that had and may not have had a relationship with Cahokia.