Florida Museum of Natural History: Ripley P. Bullen Series


There are 68 books in this series.


Please note that while you may order forthcoming books at any time, they will not be available for shipment until shortly before publication date

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Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States

The years 1500–1700 AD were a time of dramatic change for the indigenous inhabitants of southeastern North America, yet Native histories during this era have been difficult to reconstruct due to a scarcity of written records before the eighteenth century. Using archaeology to enhance our knowledge of the period, Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States presents new research on the ways Native societies responded to early contact with Europeans.

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An Archaeology and History of a Caribbean Sugar Plantation on Antigua

This volume uses archaeological and historical evidence to reconstruct daily life at Betty’s Hope plantation on the island of Antigua, one of the largest sugar plantations in the Caribbean. It demonstrates the rich information that multidisciplinary studies can provide about the effects of sugarcane agriculture on the region and its people.  

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Bears: Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Perspectives in Native Eastern North America

Although scholars have long recognized the mythic status of bears in indigenous North American societies of the past, this is the first volume to synthesize the vast amount of archaeological and historical research on the topic. Bears charts the special relationship between the American black bear and humans in eastern Native American cultures across thousands of years.

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Cahokia in Context: Hegemony and Diaspora

At its height between AD 1050 and 1275, the city of Cahokia was the largest settlement of the Mississippian culture, acting as an important trade center and pilgrimage site. While the influence of Cahokian culture on the development of monumental architecture, maize-based subsistence practices, and economic complexity throughout North America is undisputed, new research in this volume reveals a landscape of influence of the regions that had and may not have had a relationship with Cahokia.  

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Authority, Autonomy, and the Archaeology of a Mississippian Community

This book is the first detailed investigation of the important archaeological site of Parchman Place in the Mississippi Delta, a defining area for understanding the Mississippian culture that spanned much of what is now the United States Southeast and Midwest before the fifteenth century.

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Archaeology of Domestic Landscapes of the Enslaved in the Caribbean

While previous research on household archaeology in the colonial Caribbean has drawn heavily on artifact analysis, this volume provides the first in-depth examination of the architecture of slave housing during this period. It examines the considerations that went into constructing and inhabiting living spaces for the enslaved and reveals the diversity of people and practices in these settings.  

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New Directions in the Search for the First Floridians

Presenting the most current research and thinking on prehistoric archaeology in the Southeast, this volume reexamines some of Florida’s most important Paleoindian sites and discusses emerging technologies and methods that are necessary knowledge for archaeologists working in the region today.

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Iconography and Wetsite Archaeology of Florida’s Watery Realms

Beginning with Frank Hamilton Cushing’s famous excavations at Key Marco in 1896, a large and diverse collection of animal carvings, dugout canoes, and other wooden objects has been uncovered from Florida’s watery landscapes. Iconography and Wetsite Archaeology of Florida’s Watery Realms explores new discoveries and reexamines existing artifacts to reveal the influential role of water in the daily lives of Florida’s early inhabitants.

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Pre-Columbian Art of the Caribbean

Abundantly illustrated, this volume is a pioneering survey of the ancient art of the entire Caribbean region. While previous studies have focused on the Greater Antilles—Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica—this is the first book also to include the islands of the eastern Caribbean and their ties to pre-Columbian Venezuela.  

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The Cumberland River Archaic of Middle Tennessee

For thousands of years, the inhabitants of the Middle Cumberland River Valley harvested shellfish for food and raw materials then deposited the remains in dense concentrations along the river. Very little research has been published on the Archaic period shell mounds in this region. Demonstrating that nearly forty such sites exist, this volume presents the results of recent surveys, excavations, and laboratory work as well as fresh examinations of past investigations that have been difficult for scholars to access.