Browse by Subject: Southeast Archaeology

Please note that while you may order forthcoming books at any time, they will not be available for shipment until shortly before publication date

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The Historical Turn in Southeastern Archaeology

This volume uses case studies to capture the recent emphasis on history in archaeological reconstructions of America’s deep past, representing a profound shift in thinking about precolonial and colonial history and helping to erase the false divide between ancient and contemporary America.  

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The Making of Mississippian Tradition

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Archaeology in Dominica: Everyday Ecologies and Economies at Morne Patate

This volume examines the everyday lives of enslaved and free workers at Morne Patate, an eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Caribbean plantation, helping document the under-represented history of slavery and colonialism on the edge of the British Empire.

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Modeling Entradas: Sixteenth-Century Assemblages in North America

This volume brings together leading archaeologists working across the American South to offer a comprehensive, comparative analysis of Spanish entrada assemblages, providing insights into the sixteenth-century indigenous communities of North America and the colonizing efforts of Spain.

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Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States

The years 1500–1700 AD were a time of dramatic change for the indigenous inhabitants of southeastern North America, yet Native histories during this era have been difficult to reconstruct due to a scarcity of written records before the eighteenth century. Using archaeology to enhance our knowledge of the period, Contact, Colonialism, and Native Communities in the Southeastern United States presents new research on the ways Native societies responded to early contact with Europeans.

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Bears: Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Perspectives in Native Eastern North America

Although scholars have long recognized the mythic status of bears in indigenous North American societies of the past, this is the first volume to synthesize the vast amount of archaeological and historical research on the topic. Bears charts the special relationship between the American black bear and humans in eastern Native American cultures across thousands of years.

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Bioarchaeology of the Florida Gulf Coast: Adaptation, Conflict, and Change

In Bioarchaeology of the Florida Gulf Coast, Dale Hutchinson explores the role of human adaptation along the Gulf Coast of Florida and the influence of coastal foraging on several indigenous Florida populations.

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Cahokia in Context: Hegemony and Diaspora

At its height between AD 1050 and 1275, the city of Cahokia was the largest settlement of the Mississippian culture, acting as an important trade center and pilgrimage site. While the influence of Cahokian culture on the development of monumental architecture, maize-based subsistence practices, and economic complexity throughout North America is undisputed, new research in this volume reveals a landscape of influence of the regions that had and may not have had a relationship with Cahokia.  

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Authority, Autonomy, and the Archaeology of a Mississippian Community

This book is the first detailed investigation of the important archaeological site of Parchman Place in the Mississippi Delta, a defining area for understanding the Mississippian culture that spanned much of what is now the United States Southeast and Midwest before the fifteenth century.

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Archaeology of Domestic Landscapes of the Enslaved in the Caribbean

While previous research on household archaeology in the colonial Caribbean has drawn heavily on artifact analysis, this volume provides the first in-depth examination of the architecture of slave housing during this period. It examines the considerations that went into constructing and inhabiting living spaces for the enslaved and reveals the diversity of people and practices in these settings.