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Browse by Subject: Anthropology and Archaeology

Please note that while you may order forthcoming books at any time, they will not be available for shipment until shortly before publication date

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Beyond the Nasca Lines: Ancient Life at La Tiza in the Peruvian Desert

In this volume, Christina Conlee documents the cyclical rise and fall of societies in the region, with particular focus on the development of the Nasca culture, its subsequent conquest by the Wari state, followed by collapse and abandonment, and then the establishment of a new society in the Late Intermediate Period.

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Charleston: An Archaeology of Life in a Coastal Community

In Charleston, Zierden and Reitz weave archaeology and history to illuminate this vibrant, densely packed Atlantic port city. They detail the residential, commercial, and public life of the city, the ruins of taverns, markets, and townhouses, including those of Thomas Heyward, shipping merchant Nathaniel Russell, and William Aiken.

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The Maritime Landscape of the Isthmus of Panamá

Assessing sites both submerged and on land, the authors explore the maritime history of the isthmus through its many stages: from its prehistoric period through Spanish colonialism to the building of the canal and its function as a route for modern-day maritime traffic.

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Ritual and Archaic States

Ritual and archaic states frequently ignite complex debates about their defining characteristics and archaeological signatures. Offering fresh perspectives on both subjects, this volume unites the two streams of scholarship and explores the varying nature, expression, and significance of ritual in archaic states.

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Southeast Inka Frontiers: Boundaries and Interactions

Using extensive field research, Alconini explores the modes of direct contact between the Inkas and eastern tropical Lowland populations, a situation often overlooked in studies of the area. Combining both regional- and household-level perspectives, she explores the empire's impact on local settlements as well as on domestic economy, production, cultural materials, and labor organization.

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The Powhatan Landscape: An Archaeological History of the Algonquian Chesapeake

The Powhatan Landscape breaks new ground by tracing Native placemaking in the Chesapeake from the Algonquian arrival to the Powhatan's clashes with the English. Martin Gallivan details how Virginia Algonquians constructed riverine communities alongside fishing grounds and collective burials and later within horticultural towns. Ceremonial spaces, including earthwork enclosures within the center place of Werowocomoco, gathered people for centuries prior to 1607. Even after the violent ruptures of the colonial era, Native people returned to riverine towns for pilgrimages commemorating the enduring power of place.

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The Archaeology of the Cold War

The Cold War was one of the twentieth century's defining events, with long-lasting political, social, and material implications. It created a global landscape of culturally and politically significant artifacts and sites that are critical to understanding and preserving the history of that conflict. The stories of these artifacts and sites remain mostly untold, however, because so many of the facilities operated in secret.

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Paleoindian Societies of the Coastal Southeast

The late Pleistocene-early Holocene landscape hosted more species and greater numbers of them in the Southeast compared to any other region in North America at that time. Yet James Dunbar posits that a misguided reliance on using Old World origins to validate New World evidence has stalled research in this area. Rejecting the one-size-fits-all approach to Pleistocene archaeological sites, Dunbar analyzes five areas of contextual data--stratigraphy; chronology; paleoclimate; the combined consideration of habitat, resource availability, and subsistence; and artifacts and technology--to resolve unanswered questions surrounding the Paleoindian occupation of the Americas.


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Gathering at Silver Glen: Community and History in Late Archaic Florida

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Disease and Discrimination: Poverty and Pestilence in Colonial Atlantic America

Dale Hutchinson argues that most colonists, slaves, servants, and nearby Native Americans suffered significant health risks due to their lower economic and social status. With examples ranging from indentured servitude in the Chesapeake to the housing and sewage systems of New York to the effects of conflict between European powers, Hutchinson posits that poverty and living conditions, more so than microbes, were often at the root of epidemics.